RICHARDSON  THOMPSON  BUSINESS  FOR  SALE

July 5, 2016

 

NEW THINKING

Several ideas have surfaced regarding the purchase of the business which deserve consideration.  My original thinking was that I would separate out all shop equipment that was used in the manufacture of my Thompson products and sell just that. That would leave me with a nice little shop that I would use for the rest of my life.  The problem with that idea is that it is easy to determine the value for the standard items but no one could figure out what the Thompson specific equipment was worth.  Just what is the value of the Primary Receiver Milling Fixture that took 10 years and four evolving versions?  What is the value of 30,000 program code commands that was redone a dozen times?  But if a person buys the business and fails to make a go of it, those Thompson specific items are worthless.  The buyer could easily resell the standard equipment but he would have no idea how to sell the Thompson stuff.  Those things are worth way more than the standard shop equipment to someone starting a receiver manufacturing business but nothing to someone not wanting to make receivers.  

Then there is the personal aspect of it all.  I am asked how long it would take for a buyer to recover his investment.  If a person has to ask that question it is obvious that he does not have the Thompson knowledge or business ability needed.  I can tell him how long it would take me but that is me.  It becomes obvious that the big stumbling block is the Thompson aspect of the business.

 

There is the possibility that someone could purchase the complete machine shop less the cutters, fixtures, tool holders, gages, programs, drawings, etc. that are specific to the manufacture of my Thompson products.  That way the buyer would be acquiring a known commodity that can be easily evaluated.  Then I would partner with the buyer to use the shop to make the Thompson products.  The buyer would be providing the manufacturing faculty and do the manufacturing.  I would supply all the Thompson specific stuff and consulting for 25% of the gross sales.  That would remove all the unknowns for the buyer and guarantees my assistance.  If the Thompson business failed, the buyer would be left with a nice machine shop that could be used for many activities.  If the business is successful, the purchase of all the Thompson specific assets could be negotiated.  I value the shop at $150,000 cash or donation to the World Wildlife Fund.  Of course, to work the shop would have to remain where it is.

It is just a thought.  I am open to any suggestion that lets me retire without everything I have created during the last 70 years being lost.  It will not make any difference to me personally but it will mean that the Thompson world will suffer a great loss.

 

Several ideas have surfaced regarding the purchase of the business which deserve consideration.  My original thinking was that I would separate out all shop equipment that was used in the manufacture of my Thompson products and sell just that. That would leave me with a nice little shop that I would use for the rest of my life.  The problem with that idea is that it is easy to determine the value for the standard items but no one could figure out what the Thompson specific equipment was worth.  Just what is the value of the Primary Receiver Milling Fixture?  What is the value of 30,000 program code commands?  But if a person buys the business and fails to make a go of it, those Thompson specific items are worthless.  The buyer could easily resell the standard equipment but he would have no idea how to sell the Thompson stuff.  Those things are worth way more than the standard shop equipment to someone starting a receiver manufacturing business but nothing to someone not wanting to make receivers.   Then there is the personal aspect of it all.  I am asked how long it would take for a buyer to recover his investment.  If a person has to ask that question it is obvious that he does not have the Thompson knowledge or busine ability needed.  I can tell him how long it would take me but that is me.  It becomes obvious that the big stumbling block is the Thompson aspect of the business. There is the possibility that someone could purchase the complete machine shop less the cutters, fixtures, tool holders, gages, programs, drawings, etc. that are specific to the manufacture of my Thompson products.  That way the buyer would be acquiring a known commodity that can be easily evaluated.  Then I would partner with the buyer to use the shop to make the Thompson products.  The buyer would be providing the manufacturing facilty and do the manufacturing.  I would supply all the Thompson specific stuff and consulting for 25% of the gross sales.  That would remove all the unknowns for the buyer and guarantee my assistance.  At some future time, the purchase of all the Thompson specific assets could be negotiated.  If the Thompson business failed, the buyer would be left with a nice machine shop that could be used for many activities.

It is just a thought.  I am open to any suggestion that lets me retire without everything I have created during the last 70 years being lost.  It will not make any difference to me personally but it will mean that the Thompson world will suffer a great loss.

 

INTRODUCTION

The following information was prepared to assist prospective buyers in their assessment of the value of the enterprise being offered for sale in order for them to generate an offer to purchase.  This information was prepared by owner Douglas W. Richardson, 9705 Owensmouth Ave., Unit 2, Chatsworth CA 91311; telephones 310-457-6400.  E-mail address is doug937@gmail.com although because of poor eyesight, I may not respond to e-mails.  I prefer the telephone (No texting.) for most communications.

 

HISTORY

I was born in 1937.   My first memory in life was running into the kitchen to tell my mother that I had just heard President Roosevelt announce that the United States had just been attacked by Japan.  That was 1941.  For the next 4 years everybody was part of the War effort.  Most news came by weekly magazines like Life, Look, Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s .  I would take those magazines, cut out the pictures I liked and paste them in my scrap book.  Many years later, my mother showed me my scrapbook.  Every picture in the book featured a Thompson. 

I started making wood Thompsons which I would take to grade school to sell to my classmates.  Every recess we would grab our Tommy Guns to defend the world in the playground.  At 14, I was helping the ATF in Chicago identify Thompsons that turned up.  In 1957 while an engineering student at the University of Illinois working as a machinist in the University machine shop, I made my first full sized steel Thompson receiver. 

My Thompson hobby continued to develop. finally becoming a real business in1962 with a friend.  We were known as the Universal Precision Corporation.  It was a gun manufacturing business specializing in making exact replicas of very rare antique guns, miniature guns and ˝ scale Thompson SMGs.  I did all the engineering and other technical work.  My associate was in charge of the manufacturing.  After that business ended, I continued to expand my Thompson hobby with the goal of putting the Thompson back in production.  Just as I was about to start production, President Reagan signed the 1986 gun law which prevented citizens from being able to purchase new-made machine guns.  That effectively destroyed the market for a new-made Thompson gun.  So, I started to develop my tool and accessory designs,  wrote several reference manuals on the TSMG and manufactured  receivers, trigger housings and my various product designs.  I became very successful in the Thompson field, not  because I had talents no one else had, but because I combined my engineering design and manufacturing expertise with a passion for the Thompson that has now lasted for over 70 years.  I was never interested in promoting myself or making a profit as I never considered my efforts to be a business.

My hobby has been propelled by people who like what I do way beyond the hobby status yet I still have no interest in making it into a real business.  In spite of my attitude, I am, arguably, the world’s  leader in aftermarket Thompson products.  In fact, by the time I discontinued my catalog in favor of a website, there were about 8000 copies of my catalog in circulation.  That is amazing because people had to buy them.  I could not afford to give them away.    I am considered to be the leading Thompson expert with a world wide reputation both for my knowledge and designs.  I literally have no competition. At this point in time, my hobby should be made into a business with internet selling, credit card sales, computer record keeping, employees, increasing production, etc. But, I am too old and almost totally blind.  Just as the business is starting to boom, my body is starting to bust.  It is time for me to quit.

 

DRUM  MAGAZINE  MANUFACTURING  PROJECT  FOR  SALE

About 35 years ago, I partnered with the best stamping engineer and tool and die maker I have ever known to manufacture 100 and 50 cartridge capacity Colt drum magazines.  I have all the original manufacturing drawings for all the magazines so they would be original in every detail.  I was to do all the engineering and marketing.   My partner was to manufacture the magazines.  What I did not know was that he was also the slowest and most non-focused individual.  He has now retired and I have all the tools, dies, equipment, etc. that was made.  It appears that he got 90 percent done.  There must be close to one million dollars worth of work represented by what I have.  I have no stamping expertise so I long ago gave up on the project so I don’t really know what I have.  The photo shows the parts that were made including complete winding keys.

 

 

SHOP  PHILOSOPHY

The shop  I set up to manufacture Thompson receivers and other products is a dedicated manufacturing facility - not a job shop.  That means that the machines are set-up to make receivers.  The set-ups are not repeatedly put up and torn down.  They are permanent.  Any model receiver or portion of a receiver can be made at any time.  This requires a very efficient operation with a reliance on special fixtures and tooling.  The shop could be moved and production re-started as soon as power is provided to the machines.  It is also a very compact operation utilizing a shop of less than 600 square feet.  When a non-receiver product is made, special fixtures piggy-back onto the receiver fixtures.  In other words, one shift can make receivers and the next shift can make barrel wrenches on the same machines without disturbing the receiver set- up.  The key to success is the manufacturing engineering that went into the process design.  That is why most everything is special in nature and why no one can compete with me.  If someone tried, they would have to spend a huge amount of time and money to get started and that would preclude ever making a profit.  I spent my whole life getting to this point.  If I charged my time to the product, even I would lose money but that is why it is called a hobby.  No matter what I sell the business for, I will never recover my life investment in time.

Some people think they can simply install my fixtures on their machines.  Of course, that can be done but it will result in so much time wasted and increase the time to manufacture, especially with each time production is re-started, that all advantage of my efforts will be lost.  My machines are not all that valuable and can be resold at a later time without much loss.  Most of the Thompson fans have heard the comment that “the Colt machinery was moved to Savage when Savage re-started Thompson production at the beginning of WW2".  This is a similar situation and is the only way to avoid huge start-up costs.

Another aspect of the manufacturing of the receivers and all my other products that contributes to the efficiency of the operation is the documentation I have developed.  I am no where near smart enough to remember how to make Heavy Duty Barrel Wrenches after having not made them for a while.  It is the documentation that enables me to switch to manufacturing another product in less than an hours time.  Every product is completely described in a notebook.  First there is a drawing of the product and usually a photo.  That is followed by a drawing and maybe a photo of the fixture.  All fixtures are numbered for easy identification. Then there is a drawing and maybe a photo of how the fixture is installed on the machine and how the offsets are determined.  Every cutter to be used is numbered, illustrated, the source identified and the mounting of the cutter in the machine described and illustrated.  That is followed by a drawing of the raw material as required for the machine operation and its source information.  Next is an illustration and maybe a photo of how the material is to be located in the fixture. To make the part, the program, if not already loaded on the machine controller, is up loaded from the programs disc which is also in the notebook as a printout.  Prompts are included in the program to direct the operator and cutter path drawings are in the notebook.  After the part is machined. Gages and measuring tools are illustrated in the notebook along with instructions on what and how to make measurement checks.  The point is that if someone were to take over from me and ask me to instruct him on how to make one of my products, I would be unable to give precise directions.  I would reply that I am not sure, let’s go to the Product Notebook and find out.  If some one were to simply try to copy one of my products, it would take so much time to reach the level of development as documented in my Product Notebook, that the effort would be pointless. 

 

MORE  INFORMATION

My Thompson website is www.ThompsonSMG.com

 

 

ASSETS

The following list of assets are those items which are primarily used in the Thompson manufacturing which would be included in the business being offered for sale.

A)  STANDARD  MACHINERY

          1) FADAL VMC 3016HT. Vertical Machining Center

Manufactured 1995 , S/N 95-12556, 30" x 16" X & Y table travel, 20" Z axis travel + 4" above cold start = 24" total travel, 21 tool capacity automatic tool changer, box ways (provides rigidity necessary for steel cutting), 15 hp high torque motor. 3 phase, 190-510V, rigid tapping, additional coolant pump for washdown via hose & nozzle or auxiliary coolant source. 

This machine is used for the following receiver operations:21 magazine well edge rounding. Lock ramps, rear end, bore & slot, lock ramps bevels, port, 21 Magazine bevels, ejector area and barrel socket.

 

          2) FADAL VMC 3016HT. Vertical Machining Center

Manufactured 1995 , S/N 95-11215, 30" x 16" X & Y table travel, 20" Z axis travel + 4" above cold start = 24" total travel, 21 tool capacity automatic tool changer, box ways (provides rigidity necessary for steel cutting), 15 hp high torque motor. 3 phase, 190-310V, rigid tapping, extended memory, additional coolant pump for washdown via hose & nozzle or auxiliary coolant source.  This machine is wired for 4th axis.

This machine is used for the following receiver operations: blank preparation, primary machining, 21 actuator slot, length, Display sight holes, port bevel and M1 magazine bevels.

 

          3) FADAL VH65 4th Axis

Manufactured 1995 , S/N 5570594, 6" diameter face plate with 1-3/8" diameter through hole,  Buck 6" diameter x 1-1/2" diameter through hole chuck with 3 reversible jaws.  This provides 4th axis to 2) VMC

This accessory enhances the capability of the VMC but is not used in Thompson production.

 

          4) TRAK TRM Tool Room Bed-Type Milling Machine

Manufactured 1992, S/N 92-124, 2-axis CNC, hand quill, tilting head, DRO readout on X,Y, head and spindle. Fitted with custom aluminum 20" x 43" x 3"able, new work lights and Cat 40 spindle and power draw bar assembly,

This machine was purchased to cut breech entry chamfers on receivers and as a general use semi-automatic milling machine for making other Thompson products and general support work as an upgrade to the knee mill in current use. The Cat 40 conversion enables this machine to use the same tool holders as the Fadals.  The power draw bar makes tool holder changing a push button operation.

.

          5) TREE 2UVRC Knee-Type Universal Milling Machine

S/N 9254,1-1/2 hp, 220-440V, 3 phase, universal position head, variable speed, power feed on all axis, knee elevator, 13/16" collet capacity, work light, collet rack, .  Modified with automatic spindle/air switching triggered by X-axis table movement, Z-axis movement dial indicator,

This machine along with the Horizontal Milling Attachment below is totally dedicated to form the feed ramp

.

          6) TREE HA-75 Horizontal Milling Attachment

 uses the same collets and collet nut as the Tree milling machine, head rotates 360 degrees

 

          7) Vibrahone. 21"L x 11"W x 10"D tub.

                   

          8) Custom Extractor Slot Broaching Machine

Richardson designed pneumatic broach pulling machine, About 25% completed.  When finished this machine will allow broaching the extractor slots in-house.

 

B)  STANDARD  MACHINE  TOOLING  &  ACCESSORIES  &  EQUIPMENT

 

          1) Kurt D60 6" Horizontal Milling Machine Vise (2)

 

          2) Kurt 6" Versa-Tile 3-sided Milling Machine Vises (2)

                    Modified to mount on sides.

 

          3) Yuasa 550-052 12" Horizontal/Vertical Rotary Table

 

          3) CAT 40 Bench Fixture

 

          4) Lyndex Torque Claw TG-100 Torque Wrench Adaptor

 

          5) ˝" Click-Type Adjustable Torque Wrench Modified For Use With 4)

 

          7) Millabrator Tool Setting Gage

 

          8) TG-100 Collet Nut Wrench

 

          10) ER-20 Collet Nut Wrench

 

11) Lyndex & Command Stub Length CAT 40 x TG-100 Ball Bearing Collet Tool Holders (30)

 

          12) Lyndex 6" Gage Length CAT 40 x TG-100 Ball Bearing Collet Tool Holder

 

          13) Lyndex Stub Length CAT 40 x ER-20 Ball Bearing Collet Tool Holder(38)

         

          14) Command 4" Gage Length CAT 40 x ER-20 Collet Tool Holder (4)

 

          15) Lyndex Stub Length CAT 40 x ER-11 Collet Tool Holder (7)

 

          16) Lyndex 2-1/2" Gage Length CAT 40 x ER-11 Collet Tool Holder (3)

 

          17) Lyndex 4" Gage Length CAT 40 x ER-25 Collet Tool Holder

 

          18) Lyndex TG-100 Collets (54)

 

          20) Lyndex ER-25 Collet

 

          21) Lyndex ER-20 Collets (76)

 

          22) Lyndex ER-11 Collets (29)

 

          22) Lyndex CAT 40 ˝" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (2)

 

          23) Lyndex CAT 40 5/8" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (1 )

 

          24) Lyndex CAT 40 3/4" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (10 )

 

          25) Lyndex CAT 40 7/8" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (1)

 

          26) Lyndex CAT 40 1" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (4)

 

          27) Lyndex CAT 40 1-1/4" Stub Milling Cutter Holder (2)

 

          28) Lyndex TG 100 Replacement Ball Bearing Collets Nuts (2)

 

          29) Lyndex ER 20 Replacement Ball Bearing Collet Nuts (3)

 

          30)  Lyndex ER 25 Replacement Ball Bearing Collet Nut

 

          31) Spare Retention Studs (10)

 

32) Computer (old DOS unit) loaded with FADAL Programs Management Software, Cables And A/B Switch

 

          33) Lyndex CAT 40 x 1" Diameter Face Mill Tool Holder (2)

 

          34) Lyndex CAT 40 x 1-1/2" Diameter Face Mill Tool Holder

 

35) Equipment Cabinet, Art Steel Company, Master-Filer 19"W x 52"H x 29"D x 7 Full Suspension Heavy Duty Divided Drawers

 

          36) Angle Plate, 1"T x 12" x 12" x 12"

 

          37) Kurt Swivel Base For 6" Mill Vise

 

          38) Coolant Drum Hand Truck

 

          39) Command Torque Claw TG-100 Torque Wrench Adaptor

 

          40) Standard TRAK Solid Tool Holder (2)

 

          41) Sharpening Arbor For C375 Cutter

 

          42) E284 Broach Rack                                                                                    0

 

 

C)  STANDARD  INDEXABLE   MILLING  CUTTERS

 

1) Iscar #F45KT D4.0-1.50-R06 4" Diameter x 8 Flute “Octo-Mill” Face Milling Cutter

 

          2) Valenite SD-TMR-12-4 B (12T01) 1-1/2" Diameter x 4 Flute End Milling Cutter

 

4) Valenite MVMSP100R90CCEC (6T01) 7/8" Diameter x 2 Flute End Milling

                    Cutter

 

 

D)  SPECIAL TOOL  HOLDERS

 

1) Customized Lyndex CAT 40 1"  Face Mill Holder To Accept Side Milling Cutters

 

          2) E358 Breech Entry Chamfering Cutter Holder

 

          3) Richardson/Lyndex Combination Face & Side Mill Tool Holder

 

 

E)  SPECIAL  RECEIVER  MANUFACTURING  JIGS  &  FIXTURES

 

          1) Exxx Barrel Socket Threading Lathe Fixture

 

          2) E5 Blank Milling Fixtures (2)

 

          3) E352 Receive4 Length Fixture

 

          4) Exxx Receiver Length Backing Bar

 

          5) E53 M1 Magazine Well Bevels Milling Fixture

 

          6) E40 Port Bevels Milling Fixture

 

          7) E346 Primary & Top Milling Fixtures (2)

 

          8) E349 Square End Actuator Slotting Support

 

          9) E267 Vertical Milling Fixture

 

          10) E45 Port Fixture

 

          11) E61 21 Ejector Fixture

 

          12) E273 Ramp Milling Fixture

 

          13) E59 Horizontal Milling Fixture

 

          14) E354 Extractor Slot Broaching Horn

 

 

F)  SPECIAL  RECEIVER  MANUFACTURING  CUTTERS

 

          1) C27 .635 Left Hand Spiral Reamer(2)

 

          2) C36 1-1/2"D x .350"R End Mill (2)

 

          3) C290 D x #8 Step Drill

 

          4) C375 Breech Entry Chamfering Cutter

 

          5) C5 M2 Nose Form Cutter

 

          6) C104 5/16" x 1-3/8” Cutting Length x 5 Flute End Mill

 


 

          7) C288 21 Edge Rounding 5/32"R Double Sided Cutter   

 

          8) C315 Square End Actuator Slot Finishing Cutter

 

          9) C20 .050"W Threading Cutter(2)

 

          10) C30 21 Rear End Form Cutter

 

          11) C383 “S” long Shank Drill (2)

 

          12) C304 “Z” Long Shank Drill (2)

 

          13) C111 1/2"D x .031"R End Mill (2)

 

          14) C230 1/8"W x 1"D Long Neck T-Slot Cutter

 

          15) C11 M1 Form Roughing End Mill (2)

 

          16) C9 M1 Side Form Finishing Cutter

 

          17) C8 M2 Side Form Finishing Cutter

 

          18) C307 1/4"W x 1"D x .032" R Long Neck T-Slot Cutter (2)

 

          19) C4 M1 Edge Rounding 5/32"R Double Sided Cutter (2)

 

          20) C313 3/8"D x .090"R End Mill

 

          21) C311 Set of 4 Extractor Slot Broaches

 

 

G)  STANDARD  RECEIVER  MANUFACTURING  CUTTERS

 

          1) C363 1/4" Long Drill

 

          2) C369 3/32"R x .107"P CREM

 

          3) C380 1/8"P x 90 Degree CD&CS

 

          4) C347 16mm Long Drill

 

          5) C24 1/2"D Ball End Mill

 

          6) C7 3/4"D x .125"r x 5 Flute End Mill (2)

 

          7) C303 5M.8 Tap

 

          8) C46 2" Roughing End Mills (9)

 

          9) C360 45/64" Drill

 

          10) C328 9/32" End Mill (0)


 

 

          11) C300 Engraving Cutter

 

          12) C88 ˝"D X 4-1/2 OAL x 4 Flute Carbide Ball End Milling Cutter (2)

 

          13) C386 5/16"W x 6"D x 1"B Side Milling Cutter

 

          14) C122 3/4"D x 3" Cutting Length Roughing End Mill

 

          15) C124 5/16" End Mill

 

          16) C356 13mm SCSM Drill

 

          17) C3 ˝" Stub End Mill

 

          18) 1/16"R CREM

 

          19) C372 ˝" End Mill

 

          20) C43 3/4" Roughing End Mill

 

          21) C316 #19 SCSM Drill

 

          22) C82 #38 Jobber Drill

 

          23) C219 #4 x 60 Degrees x 4" CD&CS

 

          24) C359 “N” SCSM Drill

 

          25) C69 3/32"W x 5/8"D Key Seat Cutter       

 

 

H)  STANDARD  CUTTERS  OVER  3/4"  SHANK  SIZE  FOR  GENERAL USE WITH  FADALS  AND  TRAK  MACHINES (mostly  new)

 

          1) 1-1/2"D x 6 (2") Flute Roughing End Mill

 

          2)1"D x 2 (1-1/2") Flute End Mill (3)

 

          3) 1"D x 4 (2") Flute End Mil (4)l

 

4) 1"D x 5 (2") Flute Roughing End Mill (2)             

 

          5) 7/8"D x 6 (2-1/2") Flute End Mill

 

          6) 1"D x 5 (2") Flute Roughing End Mill (3)

 

          7) 1"D x 6 (2")Flute Roughing End Mill

 

          1) 1"D x 5 (3")Flute Roughing End Mill (2)

 

 


 

I)  SPECIAL  RECEIVER  MANUFACTURING  EQUIPMENT

 

          1) 8' Wall Rack For 30 CAT 40 Tool Holders

 


 

          2) Tray For 21 (FADAL Tool Magazine Capacity) CAT 40 Tool Holders (2)

 

          3) Tray For 14 CAT 40 Tool Holders

 

          4) 46" Shelf Adaptor Racks For 7 CAT 40 Tool Holders (18)

 

          5) TG 100 Collet Rack

 

          7) ER-20 Collet Rack

 

          8) ER-11 Collet Rack

 

          9) #E310 Blank Fasteners Hex Wrench & Speed Handle

 

          9) E271 Rotary Table Stops Assembly

 

          10) E71 Ramp Machining Automatic Machine Spindle & Air Controller

 

          11) E311 Extension Adaptor For Vise Speed Wrench

 

          12) E73 2S/MS Spacer (2)

 

          13) E37 M1 Bevels Set-up Stop Bar

 

          14) E277 Port Bevel Machining Clamp Bar

 

          15) Primary Fixture Blank Mounting Bolts (2)

 

          16) Top Fixture Receiver Mounting Bolts (2)

 

          17) Exxx Oversize Hand Spoked Hand Wheel For 12" Rotary Table

 

          18) E67 #4MT Center Locator For 12" Rotary Table

 

          19) E79 TREE Spindle Travel Dial Indication Attachment

 

          20) E28 Base For Versi-Tile Vise Used In Vertical Fixture

 

          21) Exxx Base For Versi-Tile Vise Used With Breech Entry Chamfering

 

          22) E281 Cutter Height Setting Adapter

 

          23) E280 Step Drill length Setting Adapter

 

          24) E187 -2 Ramp Bevels Fixture Spacer

 

          25) E275 Coolant Assembly For Vertical Fixture

 

          27) E267-1 Spacer For 2S.MS Receivers On Vertical Fixture

          28) E268 Standard-Type Vise Jaws For Vertical Fixture (2)

 

          29) E303 Standard Height Conversion Vise Jaw For Vertical Fixture

 

          30) E269 Ram. Slot Milling Fixture

 

          31) E187-1 Ramp Bevels Fixture Adaptor

 

          32) E267-2 Bore Drilling Backing For 21

 

          33) E49 Coolant Adapter For Port Fixture

 

          34) E40 Clamp Block For Port Fixture

 

          35) E351 Breech Entry Chamfering Cutter Wrench

 

          36) E77 21 Magazine Bevels Receiver Locating & Clamping Block       

 

 

 

J)  SPECIAL  RECEIVER  MANUFACTURING  GAGES

 

          1) E126 Go/No-Go Blank Bar Size Gage

 

          2) E54 Port Bevel Position Gage

 

          3) Exxx Latch Hole Depth Gaging Pin

 

          4) E308 Drum Slots Width Gage

 

          5) E396  Bolt Cannel Width Gage

 

          6) E28 Barrel Socket Diameter Gage

 

          7) E2 Ramp Cutter Setting Gage

 

          8) E95 Display  Pilot Hole Gage

 

          9) E195 Ultimax  Pilot Hole Gage

 

          10) E315 Barrel Threads Gage

 

          11) E86 #14-24 Internal Thread Gage

 

          12) E64 Receiver Bore Gage

 

          13) E291 Ramp Position Gage

 

          14) E276 Ramp Slot GO/NO-GO Gage

 

          15) E32 Receiver Length Pin Gage

 

          16) E76 21-Style Thread Gage

          17) E69 M1-Style Thread Gage

 

          18) E60 Magazine Well Width Gage

 

          19) E396  Bolt Cannel Width Gage

         

          20) E307  Bolt Cannel Width Gage

 

          21) E367 Latch Re-drilling Drill Height Setting Gage

         

          22) E29 Receiver Length Dial Indicator Gage

 

          23) E16 Extractor Slot Gage

 

          24) Exxx 3/4"-28-NS-2 Internal GO-NO/GO Thread Gages

 

          25) Exxx #14-24"-NS-2 External GO-NO/GO Thread Gages

 

 

 

K)  STANDARD  INSPECTION  &  MEASURING  EQUIPMENT

 

          1) Granite Surface Plate, 2"H x 18"W x 24"L With 2 Ledges

 

          2) Refractometer

 

          3) 8" Precision Machine Level

 

          4) Haimer S/N 80360, Universal 3D-Sensor, 3 Axis Edge & Surface Finder

 

          5) Fowler “E-Z Read”, 1-2" x .0001" Mechanical Digital Spline (Pin) Micrometer

 

6) Mitutoyo HDM192 Digimatic Height Gage, 12" Digital Height Gage With ABS & INC >odes

 

          7) Mitutoyo Electronic Sensor For Height Gage

 

 

 

L)   PRODUCTS  ON  HAND

 

          1) H56 #5-40 x 1/4"L Socket Button Head Bolt (Display sight mounting) (5000)

         

          2) H57 Sight Mounting Rivets (4000)

 

 

 

M)   PARTS  OF  PRODUCTS  ON  HAND

 

          1) H3 7/16"D x 3"L Steel Pins (for front sight driver) (25)

 

          2) H28 1/4"-28 x 5/16"L Dog point Set Screws

 

          3) H   5mm.8 x 5/16"L Dog Point Set Screws

 

          4) Straps For Universal Barrel Wrenches (46)

 

          5) 21/28 Display Pilot Blanks (31)

 

          6) Receiver Vise Spacers (20)

 

          7) Pivot Plate Tool Blades (16)

 

          8) M1A1 Bolt Top Mounted Bolt Handle Kit Knobs (2)

 

          9) 1921 Buffer Urethane Inserts (23)

 

          10) 1928 Ultimax Display Pilot Blanks (6)

 

          11) Grip Mount Retainer Frames (8)

 

          12) M1 Ultimax Sling Pilot Blanks (10)

 

          13) Sight Puller Bodies (3)

 

          14) Cleaning Rod Bushings (16)

 

          15) Cleaning Rod Bearings (3)

 

          16) Cleaning Rod Spring (1)

 

          17) Cleaning Rod Handles (2)

         

          18) Frame Assembly Pins  (112)

 

          19) Suppressor Baffles Blanks ( )

 

          20) Grip Mount Puller Hammer Material

 

N)  SOFTWARE

 

          1) Program Disks

 

          2) Manufacturing Procedures Drawings & Sketches

 

          3) Procedure Instructions

 

          6) Program Hard Copies

 

          7) FADAL Simulation Discs

         

          8) Original Thompson Receiver Drawings

          9) Original Thompson Drawings for all other parts and accessories

 

O)  TRADE  NAMES & TRADE  MARKS

1) Douglas W. (Doug) Richardson (Used only in reference to products of my design)

           2) ESF receivers

           3) Display receivers

           4) Ultimax

           5) 2M2 receivers

            6) 2MM receivers

            7) M2 receivers

             8) 2S3 receivers

            9) 2S4 receivers

            10) MS3 receivers

            11) MS4 receivers

            12) Ultimax Plus receivers

            13) “Super-Shooter” cases

            14) “CUTTS” muzzle devices

            15) M3 receivers

            16) 1921B receivers

            17) 1928B receivers

            18) M1B receivers

 

P)  PROPRIETARY  PRODUCTS

(Includes all applicable drawings, program discs & print-outs, sketches, photos, special cutters, special fixtures, special gages and special tools.)

1) 21/28 Display Receiver

2) M1 Display Receiver

3) 21/28 Ultimax Receiver

 

4) M1 Ultimax Receiver

 

5) 2M2 Receiver

 

6) 2MM Receiver

 

7) 2S3 Receiver

8) 2S4 Receiver

9) MS3 Receiver

10) MS4 Receiver

11) Semi-Auto Gun 3RD Generation

12) Semi-Auto Gun 4th Generation

13) Universal Barrel Wrench

14) Universal Compensator Wrench

15) Grip Mount Lever

16) Combo Sight Bas

17) Receiver Markings

18) Standard Front Sight Puller

19) Standard Front Sight Driver

20) Grip Mount Retainer

21) Trigger Housing Pivot Axis Assembly Pin

22) Trigger Housing Safety Axis Assembly Pin

23) Screw-On Grip Mount

24) M1 Ultimax Display Bolt Handle

25) 21 Display Pilot

26) 28 Display Pilot

27) M1 Display Pilot

28) 21 Ultimax Pilot

29) 28 Ultimax Pilot

30) M1 Ultimax Pilot

31) 28-Style Ultimax Plus Display Bolt Handle

32) M1-Style Ultimax Plus Display Bolt Handle

33) 21/28 Display Bolt Handle

34) Detachable Buttstock Adaptor

35) 3rd Hand

36) 28-Style 27A1 Bolt Handle

37) M1 Top Mounted Bolt Handle Kit

38) M1A1 Top Mounted Bolt Handle Kit

39) TSMG Frames (Trigger Housings)

40) Adjustable Rear Sight (Lyman-style)

41) Screw-On Silencer& Bipod

42) Quick Detachable Sling System

43) Actuators (21, 28, 2M2)

44) M1 Urethane Buffers

45) 21 Urethane Buffers Pilots

46) 28 Urethane Buffers & Pilots

47) Offset Pilot

48) 21 Recoil Spring Adaptor

49) Lyman-style Adjustable Rear Sight\

50) Detachable Stock Slide & Strike

51) Replacement Slide Button Kit

52) Super-Shooter Display Carrying Case

53) Pivot Plate Tool

54) 21 Buffer With Urethane Insert

55) SA (telescoping) Barrel

56) Dial Indicating Firing Pin Protrusion Gage

57) Extractor Removing Tool

58) Compensator Thread Tap

59) Grips and Buttstock Bolt Threads Tap

60) Rivet Hole Cutter

61) Barrel Vise Blocks - Receiver End

62) Barrel Vise Blocks - Sight End

63) 2S4 Semi-Auto Frame (Trigger Housing) Assembly

64) M2 Receiver

65) Integral TSMG Suppressor

66) Pivot Plate Tool

67) Screw Driver

68) Cleaning Rod

69) Vertical Grip

70) Auto-Depth Breech Entry Chamfering Cutter

71) Breech Entry Countersink

72) UZI/Thompson Folding Stock Frame (trigger housing)

73) 5/16" X 5(1-3/8")F End Mill

74) ˝" x .03"R End Mill

75) 1/4"W x 1"D Long Neck T-Slot Cutter

76) Offset Pilot

77) 1921 Pilot For Use With 1928 Buffer

78) 1921 Recoil Spring Adaptor

79) Compensator Thread Die

80) Grip, Stock & Ejector Thread Die

81) Headspace Gaging Plug

82) Barrel/Forearm Strap

83) Colt Compensator Pins

84) WW2 Compensator Pins

85) Colt Ring Sight Pins

86) WW2 Ring Sight Pins

87) Vertical Foregrip Bolts

88) SA (telescoping) Compensator

89) Grip Mount Puller

90) Heavy Duty Barrel Wrench

91) M1B Frame (Trigger Housing) With Provision For Detachable Buttstock

92) TSMG Frames (Trigger Housings)

93) M2 Folding Stock Receiver

94) Blank Firing Barrel Assemblies

95) Grip Bolt Spacers

96) Buttstock Bolt Spacers

97) Integral Suppressor

98) Screw-On TSMG Suppressor

99) Barrel/Receiver Headspace Gage

100) Barrel Headspace Gage

101) 1923 Gun

102) 1922 Gun

103) Bolts (stock & grips & forearms)

104) Forearm Band

105) Screw-On Grip Mount

106) UZI Integral Suppressor

107) Checkered M1 Bolt Handle

108) 2M2-M Bolt (M1A1 style with 1921 pilot position)

109) 2M2-2 Bolt (21 style with fixed firing pin & safety slot)

 

Q)  WEBSITE  REFERRALS  &  LINKS

 

R)  CATALOG  CUT  SHEETS  &  TEXT

 

S)  WORLD WIDE  RECOGNITION,  REPUTATION,  CUSTOMER  BASE  &  GOOD WILL

 

T)  DOUG  RICHARDSON  LIFETIME  CONSULTING  BY  TELEPHONE, LETTER  &/OR   E–MAIL